Live Like Royalty — Countries With the Highest Salaries

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You’ve probably wondered at one time or another if you’re getting what you’re worth. Perhaps you’ve thought of moving to a place that offers their citizens a higher take-home pay. If it isn’t a minimum wage job that leaves you scraping the bottom of the jar it’s the hefty taxes that will surely squeeze you dry. Here’s a list of the countries that pay the highest salaries. Something to think about if you’re fed up with making less than you’re worth!
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The Netherlands

O.K. So it’s a democratic socialist country with an average yearly salary of $29,000. This is because Netherlanders give up almost 38% of their annual income for universal healthcare and a superior education. But your work week is less than 35 hours which gives you more quality time to enjoy life itself. And don’t forget the huge benefits of free healthcare and a college education!
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France

It ranks as the seventh largest economy in the world with an average work week of 35 hours. Although taxes are approximately 49.4%, the average disposable income is roughly $29,000. France also give both mothers and fathers paid parental leave and offers the best healthcare system and paid childcare.
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Sweden

Sweden is a socialist democracy and ranked as the sixth richest country in the world exporting timber, hydro power and iron ore. Their universal healthcare and tertiary education costs people 42.4% of their income, but this still translates into a yearly disposable income of $29,185.
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South Korea

Korea is the sixth largest exporter and tenth largest importer relying mainly on foreign trade to sustain its economy. They also are the biggest exporter of energy, specifically nuclear energy which they sell to neighboring countries. The tax rate is only 12% with an average yearly wage of $25,406, but the work week can stretch to 45 hours.
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Norway

The sweet news for this socialist democratic country is that the work week is a compulsory 30 hours, and similar to countries of the same political stripes, there is universal healthcare and a higher education for all citizens. To benefit from this, Norwegians cough up 30% of their yearly average salary of $44,000.
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Denmark

The mixed economy of Denmark includes high-tech agriculture, corporate industry, deep government welfare, well-to-do living standards and a strong foreign trade. Although taxes hover around 47.9%, the average yearly take-home pay is $34,797.
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Canada

Canada has the second largest oil reserves in the world and is rich with uranium, gold, nickel, aluminum, zinc and agricultrue. There is universal healthcare and public education with an average 23% tax. With an average 32 hour work week and yearly salary of $42,000, Canuks do quite well.
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Austria

Austria has the 12th highest GDP per capita in the world and with it’s beautiful countryside and rich history, tourism flourishes to the tune of 9% of it’s gross domestic product. Although the tax rate is 49.4%, Austrians will see an average after-tax income of $31,173 per year.
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Germany

They have the largest and strongest economy in Europe but also grab the highest taxes. Germans must fork over 49.8% to the government but still walk away with an average yearly salary of $31,252. And lets not forget the universal healthcare and higher education.
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United Kingdom

Comprised of England, Scotland and Ireland, the real moneymaker here is Scotland with oil and mineral riches. Ireland produces most of the food while England relies heavily on tourism. Annual incomes here are around $45,000 per year with a tax grab of approximately 25%, but the UK also offers the benefits of universal healthcare and education.
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Australia

Australia has a strong economy and exports food , oil and minerals. The mandatory work week of 35 hours allows them more time to spend on their gorgeous beaches, and their low tax rate of 23% puts an average of $44,983 in their pockets yearly.
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Switzerland

They’re big in manufacturing, producing pharmaceutical products, specialized chemicals, precise measurement instruments and musical instruments. The tax rate is 30% and average disposable income is a comfortable $35,000 per year.
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Luxembourg

This is Europe’s financial center providing steel, rubber, chemicals and industrial machines. There are the common benefits of living within a socialist democracy as well as an average income of $53,000 taxed at 28%.
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Ireland

This country is a haven for video game designers, high-tech firms and is known as the agricultural center of the UK. With the lowest tax rate of 18.9% in all of Europe, citizens take home an average of $51,000 per year.
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United States

America is the world’s economic powerhouse with an average gross income of $55,000 per year and a tax rate of approximately 23%. This makes America the country with the highest amount of disposable income in the world. We pay for that, however, by not having the same benefits that socialist democracies enjoy.
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